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Post Production Considerations

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By Photography Course

 

An important part for a beginning photographer is to figure out your own workflow or what you are going to do with your pictures after you take them. A photographer’s workflow is your personal routine for capturing, copying, and processing your photographs. The better detail and organization you have, the more efficient you are going to be as a photographer. Your own workflow might contain more steps and you might want to go into more detail or less depending on what you feel is best for you. View an example workflow.

Step 1. How are you going to shoot your pictures?

  • JPEG – The more universal format; harder to edit exposure but is best for those just learning.
  • RAW – Some examples of RAW format are .nef, .crw, .orf. Raw format is best for those who are more advanced and have editing programs like Adobe Bridge’s Camera Raw editor or Lightroom. For Nikon the raw format is .nef, for Canon .crw, and for Olympus .orf.
  • Tiff – Some cameras can shoot in .tiff but this takes up more memory than raw even though they are both good quality, raw is usually preferred

Step 2. How are you going to copy them to your computer?

  • Directly – plugging your camera directly into your camera takes longer and will drain your camera’s battery.
  • Card Reader – Much faster and easier.
  • Wirelessly – Some camera’s and cards have WiFi or other wireless capabilities.

Step 3. How are you going to organize and name your pictures?

  • By date
  • Titles
  • Event

Step 4. What program are you going to use to move your pictures?

  • Digital Image Mover (DIM) – Free image mover. It moves and names files for clean organization
  • Adobe Bridge – Works with Photoshop, allows you to copy files from your memory card, works good if you have it.
  • Lightroom – Perfect for photographers using RAW format and don’t want to spend a lot of money on Photoshop.
  • Google Photos – Nice that it works cross-platform, but not a lot of editing capability.

Step 5. Are you going to back up your images? If so to what?

  • External Hard drive – Safe and quick, one place for all your pictures.
  • DVD – Nice if you want to easily find specific pictures, but takes a long time. Make sure your computer burns DVD’s before you buy them.
  • To the Cloud – Perfect place where you can access your pictures from anywhere you are.
  • Computer – Not very safe, if your computer crashes you lose all your pictures.

Step 6. How are you going to sort them?

  • By rating them – Programs Light Bridge and Lightroom allow you to give your pictures stars.

Deleting bad ones – We all make mistakes, no reason to keep the evidence.

Step 7. Do you want to add other info?

  • Keywords – Nice if you are looking for pictures that are related, easy option in Lightroom.
  • Metadata – Information that is important to keep with your pictures.
  • Copyright – Included with the metadata.

Step 8. How are you going to edit your pictures?

  • Camera Raw
  • Photoshop
  • Lightroom
  • Gimp

Step 9. What format are you going to save your edited pictures?

  • Make sure with edited images that you save them separately from the originals, if that means that you add a .1, .2, .3 etc for each revision or you add letters such as a, b, or c…
  • Psd – Photoshop format with layers, loss less compression
  • tiff – Smaller than psd also lossless
  • JPEG – Compresses photos, you lose important information
  • DNG – Digital negative that saves changes, especially found in lightroom

Step 10. Where are you going to backup your processed images?

  • External Hard drive – Safe and quick, one place for all your pictures.
  • DVD – Nice if you want to easily find specific pictures, but takes a long time. Make sure your computer burns DVDs before you buy them.
  • To the Cloud – Perfect place where you can access your pictures from anywhere you are.
  • Computer – Not very safe, if your computer crashes you lose all your pictures.

Work through each of the options found in these steps and figure out which you want to use and which you want to leave out to better your own workflow.

Congratulations! You’re now ready to move on!

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